Healthcare News

  • New gene variants associated with chronic back pain

    Chronic back pain is the number one cause of years lived with disability worldwide. Medical researchers have now identified three novel genetic variants associated with chronic back pain.

    Read More

  • Medicine balls: Exercise tools that add fun to fitness

    Consider working out with a medicine ball, an inexpensive fitness tool that's exploding in popularity. This weighted ball helps you develop strength, endurance and even flexibility—and many exercises are done with a partner, adding a fun dimension to workouts.

    Read More

  • Maximal running shoes may increase injury risk to some runners

    Lower leg pain and injuries have long been a problem for runners, but research at Oregon State University-Cascades has shown maximal running shoes may increase such risks for some runners.

    Read More

  • Magnetic surgical cement heals spinal fractures, provides targeted drug delivery

    Patients with spinal fractures caused by tumors or osteoporosis usually undergo a procedure called kyphoplasty, where the fracture is filled with surgical cement. While kyphoplasty can stabilize the bone, cancer patients are still often left with spinal column tumors that are very hard to reach with conventional chemotherapy, which has to cross the blood-brain barrier when delivered intravenously.

    Read More

  • Strong Workout, Stronger Recovery!

    The American Heart Association says that running is good for your heart. But for every 100 hours of running, the average runner will sustain at least one injury. But, there are things you can do after a run to cut the risk of a future injury.

    Read More

  • Can neck pain be a sign of something serious?

    It is common for people to experience pain in the right side of the neck. In most cases, the pain occurs due to a muscle strain or another benign cause. People can often treat their pain using home remedies and medications. However, for severe or prolonged neck pain, it is best to see a doctor.

    Read More

  • Four weeks of riding an e-bike promotes fitness and health

    The role of the e-bike in promoting health and fitness is comparable to that of a conventional bicycle. In particular, overweight and untrained individuals can benefit from riding an e-bike.

    Read More

  • How do you stretch out your tailbone?

    The tailbone, or coccyx, is at the bottom of the spine and helps to support the pelvis. It is possible to injure or fracture the tailbone, causing inflammation and pain. Persistent tailbone pain is known as coccydynia.

    Read More

  • Researchers determine the rate of return to sport after shoulder surgery

    Athletes with shoulder instability injuries often undergo shoulder stabilization surgery to return to sport (RTS) and perform at their preinjury activity level. Returning to sports in a timely fashion and being able to perform at a high level are priorities for these athletes undergoing surgery. Time and ability to RTS is often difficult to predict and based on a myriad of variables, including the individual's severity of injury, the type of sport (overhead, collision, contact, recreational), the athlete's level of competition, compliance with the rehabilitation program and type of surgery.

    Read More

  • Overhydrating presents health hazards for young football players

    In 2017, a University of Texas football coach created a urine-based “Longhorn Football Hydration Chart,” which labeled players with yellow urine as “selfish teammates” and those with brown urine as “bad guys.” This “hydration shaming” practice has permeated high school sports, thereby encouraging a sporting culture which equates superior performance with superior hydration.

    Read More

FirstPrevious | Pages 1 2 [3] 4 5 of 5 | Next | Last